Hattie Gladwell in Metro reported the case of a girl left with 3rd degree burns on her mouth.  She’d had a treatment session in the home of an unnamed woman after seeing that people had been treated by her for teeth whitening.

The session lasted an hour, with the woman topping up the gel every 15 minutes.  She hadn’t asked any questions about dental history, allergies, illness or medication.

An hour later, the girl’s mouth was numb, her lips were swollen and speech was difficult.  The woman told her it was normal and would wear off, but the next day it was worse. Her chemist told her to go straight to her GP, who told her she’d been stupid and prescribed anti-histamine.  This only worked briefly, so she visited another chemist, who sold her some mouth gel. Again, this had only a short-term effect.

The woman who had treated her didn’t reply to any of her calls, so she contacted the NHS Helpline and was taken as an emergency patient by a dental hospital.

The message from this story is the same as the dentists told the girl:  only a registered dental practitioner can carry out tooth whitening. Anyone who is offering the treatment should be asked for proof of their registration and licence to do so.